BodyMedia


Metabolic and activity monitoring

BodyMedia is a name synonymous with high quality, wearable monitoring devices.

Runs on SenseWear software 8.0

Compatible with the Pro3 Armband as well as the new SenseWear Armband. Ability to run both SenseWear 8.0 and previous versions of the software at the same time. Accepts previously purchased license keys for Professional access. Includes metric measurements

Download SenseWear Software vs 8.0
Registered users only


Standard features

  • Total energy expenditure (kcal/min)
  • Active energy expenditure (kcal/min)
  • METS
  • Total number of steps
  • Physical activity levels and duration
  • Sleep duration and efficiency
  • Lying down time
  • On/Off Body time

Ideal for clinical and research applications

    Regular exercise and physical activity continue to be one of the key factors in preventing chronic disease and promoting good health. Knowing how much activity and sleep your patients are getting can be difficult to understand without an objective measurement. Furthermore, physical activity is a good indicator of a person's overall mental and physical health and can change in response to prescription medications or behavioral interventions. 


Encourages compliance

The slim design of the Armband minimizes interference with the day-to-day activity of the patient. Patients can comfortably wear the Armband while sleeping, exercising and simply going about their daily routine. Designed with user-friendliness in mind, the Armband is easy to slip on and off. It turns on automatically to eliminate any non-wear time which can be difficult to distinguish from periods of low activity that accelerometers or pedometers have trouble detecting.

SenseWear

The SenseWear Armband system acts as a versatile monitor allowing you to conveniently collect and analyze information about your patients in a free-living environment, while they go about their normal daily activities. 

Used by clinical and research groups, the SenseWear System is scientifically validated and featured in over a hundred peer reviewed papers. You can review an extensive bibliography here or request from your local BodyMedia distributor.

  • Overview

  • The Science

  • The Difference

  • The Opinions

  • Extensive Validation

Overview

  • New smaller "mini" form factor
  • Rechargeable battery
  • Compatible with the SenseWear 7.0 Standard and Professional Software
  • Optional Display device for use with the Armband (sold seperately)

 

What makes SenseWear so important to medical professionals

 

Download SenseWear Software

 

 

Features and benefits

  • The SenseWear Professional software application allows you to easily upload, analyze and share data recorded with the SenseWear Armband.
  • Easily Export Data: export all recorded raw signals and derived data to other data analysis packages such as Excel or Matlab, for research applications or further analysis.
  • SenseWear PDF Report: quickly view and generate a PDF report including easy-to-read graphical presentations of your patients' lifestyles to share with them.
  • Quickly Analyze Data: in only a few seconds, upload the data from the Armband to view on your computer. Select specific time periods or events from the recorded period, view the results, zoom in and out, and select information you want to view in a report.

 

Product features include:

  • Total energy expenditure (kcal/min)
  • Active energy expenditure (kcal/min)
  • METS
  • Total number of steps
  • Physical activity levels and duration
  • Sleep duration and efficiency
  • Lying down time
  • On/Off Body time

 

How it Works

The SenseWear Armband has multiple sensors. These innovative sensors take different "views" of your patient's life. 

What we monitor:

  • Motion: The Armband contains an accelerometer, a device that measures motion.
  • Steps: The Armband counts your steps, using the accelerometer to measure the distinct patterns created by walking and/or running.
  • Galvanic Skin Response: This measures the electrical conductivity of the skin, which changes in response to sweat and emotional stimuli.
  • Skin Temperature: A sensitive electronic thermometer measures the temperature of the skin.
  • Heat Flux: Measures the amount of heat dissipating from the body. 


The SenseWear armband makes it easy to collect free-living lifestyle data from your patients

Simply give your patients an Armband to wear during their monitoring period. The Armband will hold up to 28 days of continuous data which you can download and analyze using SenseWear or SenseWear Professional Software. 

The SenseWear system bridges the gap between a clinician's advice and the ability of the patient to understand, self-monitor, and ultimately adhere to these clinical recommendations.

How to use SenseWear in your practice

1. Assess

Patients wear the Armband to give you the ability to accurately and confidently assess their lifestyle patterns and sleep efficiency. What areas are they excelling and faltering in? Are they getting enough sleep or taking enough steps? 

2. Interact

Upload data, view results, and create reports to share face-to-face with your patients. Set realistic goals for each individual. Not everyone likes the gym, so encourage others to walk to the dog an extra mile or take the stairs instead of the elevator. Analyze data with the SenseWear Software to view detailed minute-by-minute values and then export to Excel or .csv for further statistical analysis for research purposes. 

3. Set Goals

Work with patients to set short term and long term goals. The optional, real-time Display offers immediate feedback to patients on when they have reached their daily goals. Monitor your patients' physical activity levels, sleep, and steps to see if they follow your recommendations. Check progress – the better patients feel, the more active they become.

 

The Science

Your BodyMedia® Armband has multiple sensors. Those innovative sensors take 5 different “views” of your life: 

Motion

The Armband contains an accelerometer, a device that measures motion. (Your car air bag has an accelerometer in it that lets it know when you've been in an accident.) We use it to measure HOW the subject moves from multiple axis and perspectives, allowing us to better understand the activity. 

Steps

We count steps, using the accelerometer to measure the distinct movement signature created by walking and/or running. 

Galvanic Skin Response

When you sweat, your skin becomes more electrically conductive. This measurement help us see how active you are. 

Skin Temperature

There's an electronic thermometer inside your armband that helps us know how hot you are.

Heat Flux

When you move, your muscles produce heat. We measure the heat that's flowing from your body into the environment.

With the combination of theses parameters we can determine the kind of exercise and the intensity of the activity for the subject. This is important because we all burn calories differently.

The clinically proven algorithms make a comprehensive assessment of these variables – pairing up sensor data with the subjects personal information and the calorie information providing a level of accuracy not possible with any other wearable system.

The Difference

With the SenseWear Armband, you now have a window into the lifestyle of your patients. Everyone is different. As the rise in obesity continues to be one of the fasting growing epidemics, physical activity and exercise are an important component in preventing the onset of serious medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. 

SenseWear enables automated monitoring of energy expenditure, activity and sleep efficiency, giving healthcare professionals a comprehensive tool to assess, motivate, and educate patients to help change behavior. 

With the SenseWear Armband you can monitor your patients' activity and help set personalized short and long term goals to increase their physical activity and activity goals. The SenseWear Software allows physicians to directly control the level of reporting detail for each patient. With a variety of custom views, physicians can take a high-level snapshot of activity, as well as identify key activity points and trends to help educate their patients and craft a patient behavior program.

The Sensewear Armband System measures calories and activity throughout the day. That includes time at the gym or exercise class, but it also counts the calories burnt while shopping, playing with the kids, doing household chores, sitting at the movies/TV and even sleeping. In other words, when you using it, you’re measuring life!

There are several other products that measure specific metrics during a specific part of your day. But Sensewear Armband gives you a comprehensive view of your total activity on a daily basis. For example:

  • A pedometer counts steps, but we burn calories while sitting at work, lifting weights, and playing soccer with the kids. Pedometers have no way of considering these distinct events because their view of calorie burn is: steps X weight = calories.
    People spend about 3% of their day walking or running.

  • An "accelerometer" system such as the various Actigraphy devices available measures how much you move. A simple accelerometer view of calories is:movement X weight = calories. Of course, smarter systems will try and account for walking-movement as opposed to running-movement, but accelerometers don't have much to say about calories when you're not moving – when you’re watching TV, eating dinner, or lifting weights.
    People spend about 30% of their day moving.

  • A heart rate monitor measures calories during strenuous activity – like running, rowing and cycling – in a complicated manner that’s basically: Heart rate during physical activity X some personal information = calories. While heart rate monitors can be good devices for understanding how your body functions under vigorous circumstances, they don’t measure calorie burn otherwise, which means you get an incomplete view of your daily expenditure. 
    People generally spend about 25% of their day being physically active.

The Sensewear Armband System measures a more complete matrix of characteristics, and is therefore able to give you a better picture of how many calories you’re really burning all day, every day.

The Opinions

Comments from Medical Thought Leaders. A few words of praise from our best critics – the physicians and scientists that have used BodyMedia products first-hand. 

“The band is revolutionary in its ability to give quality, relevant 24 hour information about your client’s physical life. You can present them with the hard facts about how often they sleep, move and sit. More importantly you can analyse the quality of that activity. Getting them to understand things like their sleep efficiency and the amount of sedentary versus moderate activity are invaluable in creating meaningful programs for progression.” 

Anna-Louise Bouvier Physiotherapist Founder and Executive Director of PhysiociseTM Author of the new book, The Feel Good Body. Anna-Louise has been using the Armband extensively for an ABC science documentary which will be screened in October 2010. 

“The technology being developed by BodyMedia is state-of-the-art. It provides the opportunity to finally have a technique to accurately assess free-living energy expenditure

John Jakicic, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Director, Physical Activity and
Weight Management Research Center University of Pittsburgh
Department of HPRED 

Our center, which studies and treats obesity and alimentary behavior diseases, is finding many benefits in using the Armband for optimizing the therapeutic path we apply in rehabilitating these subjects. The nutritional chronobiological analysis of energy expenditure, the assessment of spontaneous and programmed physical activity, and the follow-up of these parameters were, in fact, difficult to evaluate before we acquired the Armband system.”

De Cristofaro, M.D.
Director, Regional Center for Nutritional Diseases
Giulianova Hospital
Teramo, Italy 

“The lifestyle changes targeted toward increasing daily energy expenditure is one of the cornerstone of obesity treatment...Several recent papers suggested that the Armband is an acceptable device to accurate measure energy expenditure. This information would be useful in counseling patients regarding appropriate energy expenditure during weight loss program and improving daily physical activity.”

Angelo Pietrobelli, M.D.
Pediatric Unit
Verona University Medical School
Verona, Italy 

“We believe that the data streams obtained from the Armband can be analyzed to reveal a strong correlation between worker/workplace performance.”

DJ Wilson, Ph.D.
Senior Business Analysis - Research & Development
Arup Research & Development 

“As part of an industrial safety study, we have found BodyMedia personnel to be professional and experts in their craft. Their products functioned effectively in various manufacturing environments.”

John Faulds
Manager, Human Resources
PPG Fiber Glass Products
Manufacturing Plant 

BodyMedia's technology will help us move our research out of the laboratory and into the community. It will give us the ability to get information from study participants we could previously get only in a lab.”

David Kupfer, M.D.
Chief of Behavioral Medicine & Medical Director
UPMC Western Psychiatric Institute
 

“My subjects like the Armband because they don't really notice they are wearing it. It's an exciting technology that combines physiological and activity monitoring information.”

Scott J. Strath, Ph.D.
Research Fellow
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Extensive Validation

 

Validation and Comparison Studies

  1. Giobbi G. Evaluation of total energy expenditure in adult, overweight and free-living subjects. A comparison between two methods: Factorial Method vs. SenseWear Armband “Metabolic Holter”. Clin Ter (La Clinica Terapeutica). 2008 Nov-Dec;159(6):405-7.
  2. Berntsen S, Hageberg R, Aandstad A, Mowinckel P, Anderssen SA, Carlsen KH, Andersen LB. Validity of physical activity monitors in adults participating in free living activities. Br J Sports Med. 2008 Jul 15 [Epub ahead of print].
  3. St-Onge M, Mignault D, Allison D, Rabasa-Lhoret R. Evaluation of a portable device to measure daily energy expenditure in free-living adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Mar;85:742-9. Welk G, McClain J, Eisenmann J, Wickel E. Field Validation of the MTI Actigraph and BodyMedia Armband Monitor Using the IDEEA Monitor. Obesity. 2007 Apr;15(4):918-928.
  4. Malavolti M, Pietrobelli A, Dugoni M, Poli M, Romagnoli E, De Critofaro P, Battistini NC. A new device for measuring resting energy expenditure (REE) in healthy subjects. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Jun;17(5):338-43. [Epub 2006 Mar 20].
  5. De Cristofaro P, Pietrobelli P, Dragani B, Malatesta G, Arzeni S, Luciani M, Malavolti M, Battistini NC. Total Energy Expenditure in Morbidly Obese Subjects: A New Device Validation. Obesity Research. 2005;13:A175.
  6. Wadsworth D, Howard T, Hallam J, Blunt G. University of Mississippi, MS University, Mississippi Valley State University, Itta Bena, MS. A Validation Study of a Continuous Body-monitoring Device: Assessing Energy Expenditure at Rest and during Exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):S24.
  7. King G, Deemer S, Franco B, Potter C, Coleman K. Accuracy of Three Physical Activity Monitors to Measure Energy Expenditure During Activities of Daily Living. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):S115.
  8. McClain J, Welk G, Wickel E, Eisenmann J. Accuracy of Energy Expenditure Estimates from the BodyMedia SenseWear® Pro2 Armband. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):S116-S117.
  9. Hanby C, Matthews C, Chen K. Counting Steps with Four Physical Activity Monitors. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):S117.
  10. Jakicic JM, Marcus M, Gallagher KI, Randall C, Thomas E, Goss FL, Robertson RJ. Evaluation of the SenseWear Pro Armband to assess energy expenditure during exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 May;36(5):897-904.
  11. Fruin ML, Rankin JW. Validity of a multi-sensor armband in estimating rest and exercise energy expenditure. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Jun;36(6):1063-9.
  12. King GA, Torres N, Potter C, Brooks TJ, Coleman KJ. Comparison of activity monitors to estimate energy cost of treadmill exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Jul;36(7):1244-51.
  13. Fruin ML, Rankin JW. Reliability and validity of a multi-sensor armband in estimating resting and exercise energy expenditure. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 May;35(5):S285.
  14. Hanby C, Matthews C, Chen K. Counting Steps with Four Physical Activity Monitors. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):S117.
  15. Cole PJ, LeMura LM, Klinger TA, Strohecker K, McConnell TR. Measuring energy expenditure in cardiac patients using the BodyMedia armband versus indirect calorimetry. A validation study. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2004 Sep;44(3)262-71.

 

Outcome Studies

  1. Polzien K, Jakicic JM, Tate D, Otto A. The Efficacy of a Technology-based System in a Short-term Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 Apr;15(4):825-30.

 

Scientific Abstracts & Presentations

  1. Segreti A, Stirpe E, Appodia M, Ciaprini C, Cazzola C. Energy Expenditure in COPD patients: estimating the impact of bronchodilators using SenseWear armband. Presented at the European Respiratory Society Meeting. 2009. Vienna, Italy.
  2. Alotair H, Sharif M, BaHammam A. Assessment of sleep pattern, energy expenditure and circadian pattern of body temperature for patients with acute coronary syndrome using the armband; a preliminary report. Presented at the European Respiratory Society Meeting. 2009. Vienna, Italy.
  3. De Cusatis G, Costa F, Malagrino L, Antonelli S, De Simone C, Brogi S, Santerini S, Vagaggini B, Paggiaro PL. Assessment of Physical Activity using a Multisensory SenseWear Armband during a Rehabilitation Program in COPD Exacerbation. Presented at the European Respiratory Care Association. 2009. Stresa, Italy.
  4. Gomez-Ambrosi J, Ibanex P, Vila N, Millan D, Pizzaro M, Rodriguez A, Catalan V, Gil MJ, Escalada J, Silva C, Salvador J, Fruhbeck G. Obese subjects exhibit a reduced physical activity assessed by the accelerometer Actical. Obesity Facts 2009;2(suppl 2):1-256.
  5. Morris NR, Seal HE, Stroud H, Walsh JR, Johnson BD, Adams L, Zimmerman PV. The Relationship between Physical Activity Level Six Minute Walk Distance in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients. Am J Respir Care Med. 2009;179:A3855.
  6. Morris NR, Van de Wetering RA, De Rooij M, Sabapathy S. Sensitivity of an Armband Device for Measuring Changes in Energy Expenditure during Exercise. Am J Respir Care Med. 2009;179:A3846.
  7. Mealey A, Jakicic JM, FACSM, Mealy L, Davis K, McDermott M. Univeristy of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.Validation of the SenseWear Pro Armband to Estimate Energy Expenditure during a Simulation of Daily Activity. Abstract presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2007. New Orleans, LA. USA.
  8. Davis K, Jakicic JM, FACSM, Mealy A, Mealy L, McDermott M. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Does Clothing Affect the Accuracy of the SenseWear Pro Armband to Estimate Energy Expenditure During Walking. Abstract presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2007. New Orleans, LA. USA.
  9. Calabro MA, Welk G, FACSM, Eisenmann J. Iowa State University, Ames, IA. Measurement Agreement Between Two Pattern-Recognition Activity Monitors During Free-Living Conditions. Abstract presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2007. New Orleans, LA. USA.
  10. Galvani C, Andreoletti L, Besi M, Faina M. Catholic University, Milan, Italy. Comparison of Activity Monitors Accuracy to Estmate Energy Expenditure of Daily Living Activities. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 May;39(5):S182.
  11. Welk G, FACSM, Calabro MA, Matthews C, Carriquiry A, Nusser S. Iowa State University, Ames, IA. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN. Validation of a Computerized 24 Hour Physical Activity Recall (24PAR) Instrument Using Pattern Recognition Monitors. Abstract presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2007. New Orleans, LA. USA.
  12. Troosters T, Langer D, Saey D, Gosselink R, Decramer M. Assessment of Physical Activity using a Multisensor Armband. Poster presented at the European Respiratory Meeting. 2006. Munich, Germany.
  13. Andreacci J, Dixon C, Timothy R, FACSM. Validation of the SenseWear® armband to Assess Energy Expenditure in Children Ranging in Body Size. Abstract presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2006. Denver, CO. USA.
  14. Germaine A, Buysse DJ, Kupfer DJ. Preliminary Validation of a New Device for Studying Sleep. Abstract presented at “SLEEP 2006” – 20th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (AOSS). 2006. Salt Lake City, Utah. USA.
  15. Papazoglou, DP, Papazoglou LP, Papdopoulos TP, Papanas NP, Paptheodorou KP, Kotsiou SK, Maltezos EM. Field Evaluation of a multi-sensor armband in Greek women. Abstract presented at the European Congress of Endocrinology. 2006. Glasgow, UK.
  16. Park Y. Binormal Distribution and Energy Expenditure Measured with SenseWear® Pro Armband. Poster presented at the AAHPERD National Convention and Exposition. 2006. Salt Lake City, UT.
  17. Malavolti M, Pietrobelli A, Dugoni M, Cristofaro P, Battistini NC. Modena and Reggio Emilia University, Verona University Medical School, Italy. A New Device for Measuring Daily Total Energy Expenditure (TEE) in Free Living Individuals. Abstract presented at 7th International Symposium – “In Vivo Body Composition Studies” of the Intl J of Body Comp Research. 2005. Southampton, UK.
  18. Fiocchi P, Bollini F, Lanfanchi S, Zarcone D. U.O. Relationship between Active and Total Energy Expenditure in Sindeham Chorea: A Clinical Case. Abstract presented at the Italian Association of Clinical Neurology. 2005.
  19. McClain J, Welk G, Wickel E, Eisenmann J. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ and Iowa State University, Ames, IA. Accuracy of Energy Expenditure Estimates from the BodyMedia SenseWear Pro2 Armband.Poster presented at the Annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. 2005. Nashville, TN. USA.
  20. Colombi A, Vishnubahtla S, Adams KJ, Tollerud DJ, Peele PB. SenseWear personal energy expenditure measurements for protracted, repetitive, upper-extremity tasks with and without process automation.Abstract presented at the 27th International Congress of Occupational Health. 2003. Iguasso Falls, Brazil.

 

Diet & Lifestyle

  1. Baldini M, Pasqui F, Bordoni A, Maranesi M. Is the Mediterranean lifestyle still a reality? Evaluation of food consumption and energy expenditure in Italian and Spanish university students. Public Health Nutr. 2009 Feb;12(2):148-55. [Epub 2008 May 27].
  2. Slinde F, Karlsson S, Klingberg S, Hulthen L, Svantesso U. Large Variation in Energy Expenditure in Swedish Elite Athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 May;40(5):S248-249.
  3. Johannsen DL, Welk G, Sharp RL, Flakoll PJ. Differences in daily energy expenditure in lean and obese women: the role of posture allocation. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jan;16(1):34-9.
  4. Langer D, Gosselink R, Pitta F, Burtin C, Verleden G, Dupont L, Decramer M, Troosters T. Determinants of Physical Activity in Daily Life 1 Year after Lung Transplantation. Presented at the European Respiratory Society meeting. 2008. Berlin, Germany.
  5. Pirovano A, Frige F, Veronelli A, Laneri M, Pontiroli A. Comparison of energy expenditure through armband and international physical activity quesitonnaire (IPAQ), and of energy intake through 3-days diary and 24-hours recall. Presented at 68th American Diabetes Association. 2008. San Francisco, CA, USA.
  6. Barichella M, Savardi C, Mauri A, Marczewska A, Vairo A, Baldo C, Massarotto A, Cordara SE, Pezzoli G. Diet with LPP for renal patients increases daily energy expenditure and improves motor function in parkinsonian patients with motor fluctuations. Nutr Neurosci. 2007 Jun-Aug;10(3-4):129-35.
  7. Papazoglou D, Augello G, Tagliaferri M, Savia G, Marzullo P, Matlezos E, Liuzzi A. Evaluation of a multisensor armband in estimating energy expenditure in obese individuals. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Dec;14(12):2217-23.
  8. Wadsworth D, Hallam J, Grandjean P. Differences between subjective and objective observations of physical activity for college females. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 May;38(5):S554.
  9. Ferrari E, Mussi C, Foroni M. How to Evaluate Physical Activity in the Geriatrics Clinic? Presented at the 52nd Annual meeting of the Italian Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics. 2006. Florence, Italy.
  10. Roggi C, Cena H, Turconi G. Can the Lifestyle of the Obese Patient be Assessed? Presented at the 42nd National Congress S.I.T.I.(Italian Society of Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health). 2006. Catania, Italy.
  11. Layman DK, Evans E, Baum JI, Seyler J, Erickson DJ, Boileau RA. Dietary protein and exercise have additive effects on body composition during weight loss in adult women. J Nutr. 2005 Aug;135(8):1903-10.
  12. Keim NL, Blanton CA, Kretsch MJ. America’s obesity epidemic: measuring physical activity to promote an active lifestyle. J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Sep;104(9):1398-409.

 

COPD

  1. Langer D, Gosselink R, Sena R, Burtin C, Decramer M, Troosters T. Activity Monitoring in Patients with COPD: Validation of Two Devices to Detect Postures, Steps, and Energy Expenditure. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009;179:A3849.
  2. Deering G, McCormack N, Egan C, Kelly E, O’Neill SJ, McElvaney NJ, Costello RW. Inflammation, Free-living Activities (as Measured by SenseWear® Activity Monitors) and Quality of Life in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9. Presented 2009.
  3. McCormack N, Deering B, Egan C, Costello RW. Correlates of Functional Capacity and Gender Standardised Assessment Tools in Patients with stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseass (COPD). Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9. Presented 2009.
  4. Watz H, Waschki B, Meyer T, Magnussen H. Physical Activity in patients with COPD. Euro Respir J. 2009 Feb;33(2):262-72. [Epub 2008 Nov 14]
  5. Langer D, Dobbels F, Pitta F, Burtin C, Verleden G, Dupont L, Decramer M, Gosselink R, Troosters T. 479:Physical Activities in Daily Life Remain Abnormal 1 Year after Lung Transplantation. J Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2008 Feb;27(2):S232.
  6. Watz H, Waschki B, Boehme C, Claussen M, Meyer T, Magnussen H. Extrapulmonary effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on physical activity: a cross-sectional study. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Apr;177(7):675-6.
  7. Camillo CA, Pitta F, Possani HV, Barbosa MV, Marques DS, Cavalheri V, Probst VS, Brunetto AF. Heart rate variability and disease characteristics in patients with COPD. Lung. 2008 Nov-Dec;186(6):393-401. [Epub 2008 Sep 25].
  8. Pita F, Takaki M, de Oliveria N, Sant’Anna T, Fontana A, Kovelis D, Camillo C, Probst V, Brunetto A.Relationship between pulmonary function and physical activity in daily life in patients with COPD.Respiratory Medicine. 2008 March;102:1203-1207. [Epub 2008 June 24].
  9. Cristafulli E, Bortolotti V, Beneventi C, Bellantone T, Prato F, Eutropio E, Fabbri L, Costi S, Clini E. Energy Expenditure at Rest and during Walking Test in COPD Patients on Long-Term Oxygen. Validation Study of a Body-monitoring Device. Presented at the European Respiratory Society meeting. 2008. Berlin, Germany.
  10. Hill K, Woon L, Dolmage T, Goldstein R, Brooks D. The SenseWear Armband Yields Valid and Responsive Measurements of Energy Expenditure in Patients With COPD. Presented at the European Respiratory Society meeting. 2008. Berlin, Germany.
  11. Wilcock E, Cox V, Singh S. Validity and Reproducibility of a Multisensor Accelerometer at Slow Walking Speeds in COPD. Presented at the European Respiratory Society meeting. 2008. Berlin, Germany.
  12. Patel S, Benzo R, Slivka W, Sciurba F. Activity Monitoring and Energy Expenditure in COPD Patients: A Validation Study. COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. 2007 April;3:107-12.
  13. Battaglia S, Martino L, Spatafora M, Bellia V. Correlates of Energy Expenditure and Sedentary Life in Free-Living COPD. Presented at the American Thoracic Society Annual Meeting. 2006.
  14. Pitta F, Troosters T, Probst VS, Spruit MA, Decramer M, Gosselink R. Quantifying physical activity in daily life with questionnaires and motion sensors in COPD. Eur Respir J. 2006 May;27(5):1040-55.
  15. Martino L, Battaglia S, Spatafora M, Gagliardo C, Bellia V. Correlates of body composition alterations in elderly patients with COPD. Poster presented at 7th National Congress for Pneumology. 2006. Firenze, Italy.
  16. Patel S, Sciurba. Emerging Concepts in Outcome Assessment in COPD Clinical Trials. Seminars in Respir Crit Care Med. 2005;26:253-262.
  17. Patel S, Slivka W, Sciurba F. Validation of a Wearable Body Monitoring Device in COPD. Amer J of Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 May;30:A771.

 

Children

  1. Calabro MA, Welk GJ, Eisenmann JC. Validation of the SenseWear Pro Armband algorithms in children.Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Sep;41(9):1714-20.
  2. Berntsen S, Carlsen KC, Anderssen SA, Mowinckel P, Hageberg R, Bueso AK, Carlsen KH. Norwegian adolescents with asthma are physical active and fit. Allergy. 2009 Mar;64(3):421-6. Epub 2009 Jan 27.
  3. Arvidsson D, Slinde F, Larsson S, Hulthen L. Energy cost in children assessed by multisensory activity monitors. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Mar;41(3):603-11.
  4. Waling M, Larsson C. Energy Intake of Swedish Overweight and Obese Children Is Underestimated Using a Diet History Interview. J Nutr. 2009 Mar;139(3):522-7.
  5. Dorminy C, Choi L, Akohoue S, Chen K, Buchowski M. Validity of a Multisensor Armband in Estimating 24-hr Energy Expenditure in Children. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2008 Apr;40(4):699-706.
  6. Mealey A. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Validation of the BodyMedia SenseWear Pro Armband® to Estimate Energy Expenditure in Severely Overweight Children during Various Modes of Activity.Dissertation presented and defended for PhD. 2008 July.
  7. Wickel E, Eisenmann J, Welk G. Predictive validity of an age-specific MET equation among youth of varying body size. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2007 July;101:555-563.
  8. Arvidsoon D, Slinde F, Larsson S, Hulthen L. Energy cost of physical activities in children: validation of SenseWear Armband. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Nov;39(11):2076-84.
  9. Potter C, Deemer S, Sifuentes C, Coleman K, King G, Bassett D. Accuracy of an Armband Type Physiological Body Monitor to Estimate Walking Energy Expenditure in Children. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 May;38(5):S208
  10. Crawford K, Robertson R, Burdett R, Goss F, Jakicic JM, Nagel-Stilley E. Validation of the SenseWear Armband to Assess Energy Expenditure of Adolescents During Various Modes of Activity. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):S437.

 

Cystic Fibrosis

  1. Dwyer TJ, Alison JA, McKeough ZJ, Elkins MR, Bye PR. Evaluation of the SenseWear activity monitor during exercise in cystic fibrosis and in health. Respir Med. 2009 Oct;103(10):1511-7. Epub 2009 May 23.
  2. Troosters T, Langer D, Vrijsen B, Segers J, Wouters K, Janssens W, Gosselink R, Decramer M, Dupont L.Skeletal muscle weakness, exercise tolerance and physical activity in adults with cystic fibrosis. Eur Respir J. 2009 Jan;33(1):99-106. [Epub 2008 Aug 20].
  3. Dwyer T, Alison J, McKeough Z, Elkins M, Bye P. 1. Discipline of Physiotherapy, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2.Repiratory Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia.Evaluation of the SenseWear Pro3 Armband to Measure Energy Expenditure during Treadmill Walking in CF and Healthy Age-matched Control Subjects. Abstract presented at 22nd Annual Cystic Fibrosis Conference. 2008, Orlando, FL. USA.
  4. Junge S, Plischke M, Stein L, Tegtbur U, Ballmann M. 1.Ped Pneumology, medical School, Hannover Germany; 2.Peter L. Reichertz Institute for Medical Informatics University of Braunschweig-Institute of Technology, Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 3.Centre of Sports Medicine, Medical School, Hannover, Germany. A New Device for Measuring Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis. Poster presented at the 22nd Annual Cystic Fibrosis Conference. 2008, Orlando, FL. USA.
  5. Junge S, Stein L, Tegtbur U, Ballmann M. 1.Ped Pneumology and Neonatology, Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 2.Centre of Sports Medicine, Medical School, Hannover, Germany. Age and Sex Related Physical Activity in Children and Adolescents with Cystic Fibrosis. Poster presented at the 22nd Annual Cystic Fibrosis Conference. 2008, Orlando, FL. USA.
  6. Fleet-Mischaliszyn S, Soreca I, Otto A, Jakicic JM, Fagiolini A, Kupfer D, Goodpaster B. A Prospective Observational Study of Obesity, Body Composition, and Insulin Resistance in 18 Women with Bipolar Disorder and 17 Matched Control Subjects. J Clin Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;69(12):1892-900. [Epub 2008 Oct 21].

 

Cancer

  1. Cereda E, Turrini M, Ciapanna D, Marbello L, Pietrobelli A, Corradi E. Assessing energy expenditure in cancer patients: a pilot validation of a new wearable device. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2007 Nov – Dec: 31(6):502-7.
  2. Fouladiun M, Korner U, Gunnebo L, Sixt-Ammilon P, Bosaeus I, Lundholm K. Daily physical activity-rest in relation to nutritional state, metabolism, and quality of life in cancer patients with progressive cachexia. Clin Cancer Res. 2007 Nov;13(21):6379-85.

 

Diabetes

  1. Pes GM, Tolu F, Battistini NC, Delitala G, Maioli M. Chronobiologic analysis of physical activity in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). G It Diabetol Metab. 2009;29:60-65.
  2. Valitutti T, Bellistri G, Mauri C, Frige F, Laneri M, Turri O, Veronelli A, Pontiroli A. Comparison of insulin resistance, energy expenditure, enothelial function, and inflammation in anorexia nervosa and in cachexia. Presented at 68th American Diabetes Association. 2008. SanFrancisco, CA, USA.
  3. Andre D, Wolf D. BodyMedia, Inc. Pittsburgh, PA. Recent Advances in Free-Living Physical Activity Monitoring: A Review. J Diabetes Sci Technol 2007;1(5):760-767.
  4. DeFeo P, DiLoreto C, Ranchelli A, Fatone C, Miccio M, Gambelunghe G, Lucidi P. Alternative Indicators in Metabolic Control. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practive. 2006;74:S72-S66.
  5. Mignault D, St-Onge M, Karelis AD, Allison DB, Rabasa-Lhoret R. Evaluation of the Portable HealthWear Armband: a device to measure total daily energy expenditure in free-living type 2 diabetic individuals.Diabetes Care. 2005 Jan;28(1):225-7.

 

Heart Rate

  1. Crawley M. Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH. Validation of the SenseWear HR Armband for Measuring Heart Rate and Energy Expenditure. Dissertation submitted and defended for MS. 2008 May.
  2. Al-Ahmad A, Homer M, Wang P. Stanford University Medical Center. Accuracy and Utility of Multi-Sensor Armband ECG Signal Compared to Holder Monitoring. Presented at New Arrhythmia Technologies Retreat. 2004. Chicago, IL. USA.

 

Sleep

  1. Verbraecken J, Van Grasdorff S, Michiels F, Hamans E, Boudewyns A, Van de Heyning P, De Backer W, Cluydts R. Nocturnal energy expenditure, heat flux, and galvanic skin response in mild and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Presented at the European Respiratory Society meeting. 2008. Berlin, Germany.
  2. Miwa H, Sasahara S, Matsui T. Roll-over detection and sleep quality measurement using a wearable sensor. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2007 Aug;2007:1507-10.
  3. Germaine A, Buysse DJ, Kupfer DJ. Preliminary Validation of a New Device for Studying Sleep. Abstract presented at “SLEEP 2006” – 20th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS). 2006. Salt Lake City, UT. USA.
  4. Rizzi M, Pecis M, Andreoli A. Energy Expenditure in Obese Patients Suffering from Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrom (OSAS). Poster presented at the XVI National Congress of the Society of Sleep Medicine (AIMS). 2006. Milan, Italy.

 

Intensive Care

  1. Rokuss K, Kalenka A, Bender HJ, Hinkelbein J. Intensive care patients. Determining daily energy expenditure – a comparison of two methods. Anaestheisist. 2009 Aug;58(8):787-94.

 

Other Topics

  1. Theiss HD, Adam M, Greie S, Schobersberger W, Humpeler E, Franz WM. Increased levels of circulating progenitor cells after 1-week sojourn at moderate altitude (Austrian Moderate Altitude Study II, AMAS II). Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2008 Feb;160(2):232-8. [Epub 2007 Oct 13].
  2. Jin GH, Lee SB, Lee TS. Context awareness of human motion states using accelerometer. J Med Syst. 2008 Apr;32(2):93-100.
  3. Lee SB, Cha EJ, Lee TS. Analysis of physical activities in Taekwondo Pumsae. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2008;2008:5164-7.
  4. Alberti G, Gaeni M, Caimi A, Pisoni D, Roi G. Energetic expenditure during in-field rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction in soccer players. Presented at the Annual Conference of the American College of Sports Medicine meeting. 2008. Indianapolis, IN, USA.
  5. Bernsten S. Ledrup Carlsen K, Anderssen S, Carlson K. Do asthmatics who report exercise limitations participate in less physical activity of intensive character. Presented at the European Respiratory Society. 2008. Berlin, Germany.
  6. Sharkey PF, Danoff JR, Klein GR, Parvizi J. Surgeon energy expenditure during total joint arthroplasty. J Arthroplasty. 2007 Feb;22(2):210-2.
  7. Manfredi F, Borleri D, Mosconi G. Measurement of energy expenditure in a group of construction workers during work. G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2007 Jul-Sep:29(2 Suppl):722-5.
  8. Lee SB, Hong JH, Lee TS. Analysis of physical activities in wu-shu training. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2007 Aug;2007:632-5.
  9. Lisetti C, Nasoz F. Affective Intelligent Car Interfaces with Emotion Recognition. Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction. 2005. Las Vegas, NV. USA.
  10. Krause A, Siewiorek DP, Smailagic A, Farringdon J. Unsupervised, dynamic identification of physiological and activity context in wearable computing. Proceedings of the 7th IEEE International Symposium of Wearable Computers. 2003. White Plains, NY. USA.
  11. Bodine K, Gemperle F. Effects of Functionality on Perceived Comfort of Wearable Devices. Proceedings of the 7th IEEE International Symposium on Wearable Computers. 2003. White Plains, NY. USA.

 

Reviews

  1. Mafra D, Deleaval P, Teta D, Cleaud C, Perrot MJ, Rognon S, Thevenet M, Arkouche W, Jolivot A, Fougue D.New measurements of energy expenditure and physical activity in chronic kidney disease. J Ren Nutr. 2009 Jan;19(1):16-9.
  2. Andre D. Assessing resting metabolic rate using a multi-sensor armband. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2007 May;15(5):1337;author reply 1337-8.
  3. De Feo P, Di Loreto C. University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. Review: Evaluation of the SenseWear Pro Armband to assess Energy Expenditure during exercise. Diabete in Movimento (Diabetes in Movement), Italy. 2005. June: Issue 5, year 4.

 

Internal White Papers

  1. Andre D, Pelletier R, Farringdon J, Safier S, Talbott W, Stone R, Vyas N, Trimble J, Wolf D, Vishnubhatla S, Boehmke S, Stivoric J, Teller A. The Development of the SenseWear® armband, a Revolutionary Energy Assessment Device to Assess Physical Activity and Lifestyle. Copyright © 2006 BodyMedia, Inc.
  2. Kasabach C, Pacione C, Stivoric J, Des M, Teller A, Andre D. Why the Upper Arm? Factors Contributing to the Design of an Accurate and Comfortable, Wearable Body Monitor. Copyright © 2002 BodyMedia, Inc.
  3. Farringdon J, Wolf D. Does Heart Rate Predict Energy Expenditure? Yes, But… Oct. 2006. BodyMedia, Inc.
  4. Sunseri M, Liden C, Farringdon J, Pelletier R, Safier S, Stivoric J, Teller A, Vishnubhatla S. The SenseWear® Armband as a Sleep Detection Device. BodyMedia, Inc.
  5. Liden C, Wolowicz M, Stivoric J, Teller A, Kasabach C, Vishnubhatla S, Pelletier R, Farringdon J, Boehmke S. Characterization and Implications of the Sensors Incorporated into the SenseWear® Armband for Energy Expenditure and Activity Detection. BodyMedia, Inc.
  6. Liden CB, Wolowics M, Stivoric J, Teller A, Vishnubhatla S, Pelletier R, Farringdon J. Accuracy and Reliability of the SenseWear Armband as an Energy Expenditure Assessment Device. BodyMedia, Inc.
  7. Liden CB, Wolowicz M, Stivoric J, Teller A, Vishnubhatla S, Pelletier R, Farringdon J, Boehmke S. Benefits of the SenseWear Armband over other Physical Activity Measurement Techniques. BodyMedia, Inc.

 

Book Chapters

  1. Andre D, Teller A. Health. Care. Anywhere. Today. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics. 2005. 118:89-110.
  2. Farringdon J, Nashold S. Continuous Body Monitoring. Ambient Intelligence for Scientific Discovery. 2005. 3345:202-223.

Three reasons to choose SenseWear…

1

Accurate

2

Reliable

3

Easy to use